deciding which sport your child should try next

Question: Which sports can your child play from preschool through high school?

Pinterest

So you have a young child and they’re trying out just about every sport to see what they like. That means you’re like most other families trying to cram in everything! Really! One thing has become apparent, competitive sports are definitely starting younger than they were in my day! I mean, we could join a team for the first time in middle school and still be okay – after all, there were fewer summer camps in those days, and definitely less of an issue for kids to not be in a sport until then. Well, those days have changed. Now we have 7 year olds vying for spots on travel soccer teams and kindergarteners who have mastered the cross over and can shoot threes. For realz! So, if you’re looking at a sport that your child can play through high school, what should you consider?

Considering sports for your kids

There’s nothing wrong with trying a sport or two or three in preschool. Many families choose a variety sports camp where a child tries out a different sport each day of the week of camp. From there, the sport or sports the kids seem interested in and don’t totally bomb, the families sign the kids up for a season of that sport. The problem is, in  most sports, you have to know months in advance before the season starts. Summer T-ball? Sign up in February. Fall Soccer? Sign up in early June. Oh my! Yes, this can be stressful because by the time that season comes around your child may no longer like that sport! And, then what? You’re out the money and it is too late to sign up for some of the other sports.

Luckily there are sports which enroll year round, so keep these sports in mind.

Sports which are easy to sign up for year-round

Don’t forget the value of just playing sports in the backyard! Your child can learn to swing a golf club with you, just as they can learn to dribble on the concrete sidewalk.

Other things to consider for sports

If your child is a little bit older (say older elementary age) and is just becoming interested in a sport, consider trying it for a recreational camp over the summer to see if they like it. To know if it has staying power consider if it is a no-cut sport at the high school level. If the sport has tryouts, know that more time and energy (and money!) will likely need to be invested in the sport if your child wants to be competitive at that sport for their school.

The below example shows which sports at Plymouth-Canton Community schools in Michigan offers. Being one of the largest school districts in Michigan, it is an example of what no-cut may be at the high school level for large schools. Smaller schools may have a more liberal option for getting kids enrolled in the sport at an older age.

Fall Sports Winter Sports Spring Sports
Football

(9th/JV/Varsity, “no cut”)

Boys and Girls Basketball

(9th/JV/Varsity, tryouts)

Baseball

(9th/JV/Varsity, tryouts)

9th Self-Funded

Boys & Girls Cross Country (“no cut”) Boys & Girls Bowling (tryouts)

Self-Funded

Boys Golf

(tryouts)

Boys Soccer

(9th/JV/Varsity, tryouts)

Boys Ice Hockey (“no cut”)

Self-Funded

Boys & Girls Lacrosse

(JV/Varsity, “no cut”)

Self-Funded

Boys Tennis (“no cut”) Boys Swim/Dive (“no cut”) Boys & Girls Track & Field

(“no cut”)

Girls Golf (tryouts) Wrestling (“no cut”) Girls Soccer

(9th/JV/Varsity, tryouts)

Girls Swim/Dive (no cut) Girls Competitive Cheer

(JV/Varsity, tryouts)

Self-Funded

Softball

(JV/Varsity, tryouts)

Girls Volleyball

(9th/JV/Varsity, tryouts)

Gymnastics

(no cut)

Girls Tennis (“no cut”)
Sideline Cheer

(JV/Varsity, tryouts)

Self-Funded

Girls Ice Hockey

(tryouts)

Self-Funded

Pom Pon

(JV/Varsity, tryouts)

Self-Funded

As you can tell there are many sports to consider for your child. It really is never too late to enjoy being active, but for some sports, the competition begins at a young age, and conditioning happens year round. Consider this, as well as expenses as you decide upon activities for your child.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *